Syphilis Outbreak in Western Australia. Campaign Content.

⚠️ There’s a syphilis outbreak in Western Australia! ⚠️

To respond to the outbreak, our team of young people created a variety of resources to help you understand what syphilis is and why it’s important to get tested for it.

We’ve created content using different mediums and with different communities in mind- so have a search through and find what works best for you!

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection, or STI. It is easily transmitted by oral, vaginal or anal sex, as well as skin-to-skin contact and kissing. Symptoms vary by stage, but often take the form of painless sores around the mouth, anus or genitals, or a rash on the body, palms or soles of the feet.

However, many people do not show these symptoms even though they are still infected. They could be unknowingly spreading the infection to others. This is why it is so important to get tested for syphilis whether you show symptoms or not.

Syphilis can be tested for in a blood test, or by a swab if you have symptoms. Not all doctors check for syphilis routinely, so make sure you ask specifically for it.

Syphilis is so dangerous because, if left untreated, it can cause serious mental and physical impairments later in life. It can even be passed onto babies during pregnancy, so it is crucial that people who are pregnant get tested before and throughout their pregnancy.

The good news is syphilis is easily treatable if caught early, and using barrier methods like condoms, dental dams and gloves offer great protection to stop the spread.

Videos

For more information on syphilis, we made a video with everything you need to know:

Pressed for time? Here is what you need to know in exactly one minute!

We visited WAAC’s M Clinic in Perth/Boorloo to investigate the syphilis outbreak – Why young people should care about it and what can we do about it.

Prefer shorter videos? We got you covered.

What is syphilis?

Why should I care about the syphilis outbreak?

How to not get syphilis?

What’s involved in a syphilis test?

How do I get a syphilis test?

Is syphilis easy to treat?

What to do if you or your partner tests positive for syphilis?

How can I help my friends not get syphilis?

As part of the KickstArt Festival 2021, we partnered with WAAC’s M Clinic to provide a webinar. Here’s the snippet of the workshop about syphilis.

 

TikTok Videos

These videos were created to raise awareness of the syphilis outbreak, whilst using current video trends.

@theyepproject

Protect yourself and your partner/s from syphilis by using c0nd0ms and dams. #syphilis #fypシ #viral #sexualhealth #wellbeing

♬ original sound – Matt Randone

@theyepproject

Ask your doctor for a syphilis test besties. Your sexual health and well-being is important ✨ #syphilis #fypシ #viral #sexualhealth #wellbeing

♬ Roman Holiday – Nicki Minaj

Syphilis infographic posters

Target audience: All young people

Syphilis Campaign Cover, social media tile

 

Download PDF here: Syphillis Campaign Cover Tile

 

Syphilis Campaign Cover, poster

Download PDF here: Syphilis Campaign Cover Poster

 

Target audience: All young people

Syphilis information poster

Download PDF here: Syphilis infographic young people

 

Target audience: LGBTIQA + young people

Download PDF here: Syphilis infographic LGBTIQA

Target audience: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people

Download PDF here:  Syphilis  infographic Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Target audience: Young Women, particularly CaLD

Download PDF here: Syphilis infographic young women

Text Reads: What is Syphilis?

  • A sexually transmitted infection (STI).
  • Passed on through any sexual act for example: oral sex, anal sex, vaginal sex, kissing or skin-to-skin contact.

Why should I care about it?

  • We are seeing a massive spike in syphilis all across WA, and specifically in young people.
  • It’s easy to transmit because people often don’t know they have it.
  • It can harm a baby during pregnancy and cause stillbirths and other complications.
  • If left untreated it has serious effects on the body.

What does it look like?

  • Most people don’t have any symptoms.
  • Some develop sores on their genitals, anus or mouth.
  • Can also present as rashes on the face, palms or body.

I think I have Syphilis, what do I do?

  • Go to a GP or sexual health clinic and ask for a syphilis test.
  • Treatment involves antibiotics and usually goes away within a week.
  • Early intervention is key so if you test positive it’s important to notify your sexual partner/s as soon as possible.

How can it be prevented?

  • Use barrier methods (condoms, internal condoms, dental dams and gloves).
  • Engage in regular STI testing.

How often should I get tested?

  • If you’re sexually active with multiple partners, test every 3-6 months.
  • If you have 1 or 2 partners, test every 6-12 months.
  • If a sexual partner has recently tested positive, you should get tested as soon as possible.

How do I get tested?

  • Syphilis is detected through a blood test, or a swab test if a sore is present.
  • Ask your GP or health practitioner to test for syphilis as some STI testing might not test for syphilis specifically.
  • If you’re in regional WA you could have access to a finger prick blood test which finds results in just 15 minutes.
  • For a list of youth friendly sexual health services, visit: http://theyepproject.org.au/resources/referral-resource-2020/

How can I help others?

  • Be an advocate: talk to your friends about testing regularly.
  • Be supportive: help to reduce the shame and stigma around STI’s.

Get tested for syphilis by visiting your local GP or sexual health clinic today.

 

 

Target audience: All young people

Syphilis parody poster

Download PDF here: Syphilis Parody Poster 2

 

Text Reads: COVID-19 isn’t the only health crisis in WA.

Got a SYPHILIS symptom? Get tested.

Don’t? Get tested.

Many syphilis cases don’t show the following common symptoms:

  • sores on mouth and/or groin
  • rashes on palms, soles, chest or back
  • sore throat

Testing is available at sexual health clinics or ask your GP

 

Target audience: Schools,  youth centres

Syphilis parody poster

Download PDF here: Syphilis Parody Poster

 

Test reads: Help stop the spread! COVID-19 isn’t the only health crisis in WA. Sy[hilis cases have skyrocketed recently.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmitted by skin-to-skin contact.

Symptoms include painless sores often around the mouth or genitals, or rashes on the hands, soles, palms or back.

Many people do not show symptoms but are still infectious.

Putting a barrier between you and your partner helps stop the spread (condoms, dams and gloves)

Ask for a syphilis test at a sexual health clinic or ask your GP.

For more information about syphilis & to find a clinic visit couldihaveit.com.au

 

Syphilis infographic slide tiles

Target audience: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people

Download PDF here: Let’s Yarn About Syphilis Slides

This video was designed to ‘put a face behind the tiles’ above

Text Reads: LET’S YARN ABOUT SYPHILIS. What is it? Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that is passed on through any type of unprotected sexual act (including oral sex, anal sex, and acts using your hands) and kissing. It may have no symptoms and is easily passed on.

Who’s at risk? Any sexually active person can get syphilis through unprotected sex. At the moment we are seeing an increase of cases in young people aged between 15 – 29 in WA. Syphilis can also be given to bub during pregnancy.

What does testing look like? Syphilis is detected through a blood test or a swab test of a sore. If you’re in regional WA you could have access to a finger prick blood test which finds results in just 15 minutes.

How do I know if I have it? Signs of syphilis can include sores on your genitals and/or mouth, or a rash on your palms, feet, or body. But a lot of people have no symptoms, so it’s important to get tested regularly. Syphilis symptoms often disappear, but the infection remains. In order to go away, syphilis must be treated by a medical professional.

What does treatment look like? The good news is that syphilis is very treatable and can be treated with a doctor visit. Treatment is usually a dose of penicillin. If you’re allergic to penicillin the doctor will prescribe you something else. Syphilis is easier to treat the quicker you catch it.

How do I tell my partner? As syphilis is highly contagious if you test positive its important to tell your previous partners straight away. If you don’t feel comfortable telling your partner directly you can ask the clinic where you were tested to notify them or you can send an anonymous text message from websites like;

www.thedramadownunder.info/

www.bettertoknow.org.au

www.letthemknow.org.au

How can I protect myself and others? The best way to prevent the spread of syphilis is by practicing safe sex: using barrier methods like condoms, dental dams, internal condoms, and gloves. Getting tested every 3 months and staying on top of your sexual health also reduces your risk. Ask for a syphilis test at your GP or sexual health clinic.

Where can I get tested in Perth? See our referral guide! www.theyepproject.org.au/resources/referral-resource-2020/

 

Target audience: MSM community

Social media information tiles

Download PDF here: Syphilis MSM Slides

Text Reads: What is Syphilis?

  • A sexually transmitted infection (STI)
  • Passes from person to person through any sexual act (like oral sex, anal sex, vaginal sex, handjobs) or skin-to-skin contact

Skin-to-skin. “Skin-to-Skin” contact refers to transmission that occurs when an affected area of skin from an infected person comes into contact with an opening (e.g mouth, anus, eye, open wound, etc.) of an uninfected person.

How do I know if I have it?

  • Most people don’t have any symptoms
  • Sores, usually on or in the genitals, mouth or anus
  • Rash on the palms, feet or body
  • The only way to know for sure is to get tested.

Why should I care about syphilis? We are seeing a massive spike in syphilis across WA.

  • It’s easy to transmit because people often don’t know they have it.
  • It can harm a baby during pregnancy and cause stillbirths
  • If left untreated it has pretty serious effects on the body. Which can result in death.

How can it be prevented? Use barrier methods.

  • Condoms
  • Internal condoms
  • Dental dams
  • Gloves

Have regular STI tests. Ideally every 3-6 months, but at least once a year.

I think I have syphilis, what do I do? Go to a GP or sexual health clinic and ask for a syphilis test as soon as possible.

  • To treat syphilis, it’s just one dose of antibiotics and usually goes away within a week.
  • Early intervention is key so if you test positive it’s important to notify your sexual partner/s as soon as possible.

How do I get tested?

  • Syphilis is detected through a blood test, or a swab test if a sore is present.
  • Ask your GP or health practitioner to test for syphilis as some STI testing might not test for syphilis specifically.
  • If you’re in regional WA you could have access to a finger prick blood test which finds results in just 15 minutes.

How often should I get tested?

  • If you’re sexually active with multiple partners, test every 3-6 months.
  • If you have 1 or 2 partners, test every 6-12 months.
  • If a sexual partner has recently tested positive, you should get tested as soon as possible.

How can I help others? Be an advocate: talk to your friends about testing regularly. Help to reduce the shame and stigma around sexually transmitted infections.

 

These resources are available for you to download and share face-to-face and online across your communities.

What's happening at YEP

Safe Schools Coalition WA: Introductory Session

Read more »

YEP at Fairground 2016

Read more »

Meet the team

Page not found

Meet the crew »

Let's keep in touch

or

Subscribe and receive monthly updates on news and our latest resources.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Where are we?

Our offices are with the friendly team and YACWA

4/196 Oxford Street, Leederville 6007, Western Australia

T: (08) 9227 5440 T: 1800 670 231
F: (08) 9238 7446 E: yep@yacwa.org.au

Follow Us